Full Record

Legal Research Report: Criminalization of illegal entry around the world, August 2019 (Online)
Year:
2019
Format:
Online
Call No:
Online
Publisher:
Washington, D.C.: Law Library of Congress
Notes:
Summary from report" SUMMARY On the basis of a worldwide survey, this report identifies 162 countries that have laws criminalizing or otherwise punishing illegal entry. The chart shows countries that impose criminal sanctions for illegal entry as well as countries that impose only civil or administrative penalties (typically fines and deportation). The research identified 124 countries that treat illegal entry as a crime. Countries included in the survey demonstrate a wide range of punishments for illegal border crossing, including deportation, fines, detention, community service, and imprisonment of varied terms. As a rule, the length of imprisonment, which may vary from several months to fifteen years, depends on the circumstances under which the entry occurred. Most of the countries provide for stricter punishments if the illegal entrants were armed, used or threatened to use force, used motorized vehicles to cross the border, or inflicted damage to private property in the course of illegal entry. In some jurisdictions illegal entry by a group entails harsher punishment than illegal border crossing by an individual. The countries that only impose civil or administrative penalties include Angola, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Columbia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Turkey, Venezuela, and Vietnam. Even in these countries, however, criminal sanctions may apply if aggravating circumstances are present. Countries often exempt undocumented entrants from penalties when they are seeking asylum or are otherwise entitled to international protection. The ?Additional Comments? section of this chart mentions this exemption only when it is expressly referenced in the immigration or illegal entry laws of the countries surveyed. This report does not address the issue of smuggling people across borders or the facilitation of irregular entry, which appears to be criminalized in every jurisdiction surveyed.

Item Availability
Item Availability
Contact Library
Similar Items
Similar Items
LIV Social
Footer